Articles


Karen Staudt-Cartabona, right, with BOB at Westminster 2019, GCh. Majenkir Bookstor Spellbinder, handler Justine Spiers and judge Jamie Hubbard. Photo JC.

Sighthounds at the "Show Dogs of the Year" Awards Dinner

     The annual Show Dogs of the Year Awards banquet, sponsored by Purina ProPlan in partnership with Dog News Magazine, was held at Gotham Hall in New York City on the evening of February 8, 2020 — the day before the start of Westminster Kennel Club's 144th annual dog show.

 


Eng. Am. Ch. Courtenay Fleetfoot of Pennyworth, 29 BIS 1963-1964. Photo Burwell.

All-Time Whippet Records

In early February this year breed history was made when the red-fawn-and-white Whippet bitch Bourbon, one of the country's most successful show dogs last year, won her 73rd all-breed Best in Show in Atlanta, Georgia, and thereby set a new record for Whippets in the U.S.


Photo by Jessica Bolander

Survival of the Prettiest?

When people ask me how to judge my breed — and they do — my advice is NOT to look for the prettiest dog in the ring. That gets them every time: "What, not put up the prettiest dog? Isn't that what dog shows are for?"

No, not necessarily, at least not if you agree that dog shows should be more than a superficial exercise is who's the cutest, who is the flashiest, whom does the novice spectator's eye go to firsst? If that is what you think dog shows should be — and there are lots of people who obviously do — then read no further; you will find your views amply supported by many judges coming soon to a local dog show near you.


Azawakh BOB (left) & BOS. The BOS bitch would not stand still until the judge moved away from her to the other side of the male! Photo Paul Lepiane.

Judging Sighthounds at the "Nordic Winner Show" in Stockholm

     Dog shows in Scandinavia are in many ways quite different from what we are used to in the U.S. They are in general much bigger, often with several thousand dogs entered even at fairly average shows, and the best ones are much more than just conformation events.


SBIS & BIS Int. Ch. Aziz Karim winning Best In Show under Karin Hedberg, Kennel Kashmanis, Sweden, at the Finnish Saluki Specialty 2017. Photo: Pasi Soininen.

Breeders Forum: Stina Jalkanen, Aziz Salukis, Finland

Q: How did you start in dogs? When and how did you fall in love with your breed (or breeds), and how did you go about founding your current breeding program? Briefly outline the most important breeding decisions you made and identify the most successful dogs you have bred. Do you believe in linebreeding or outcrossing?


Panda-marked Afghan Hound at a show in Europe.

Color Me Controversial

In this the second* of three articles dealing with controversial colors and patterns in various Sighthound breeds, we cover the Afghan Hound, Scottish Deerhound, Rhodesian Ridgeback and Basenji. Although color seems like a trite characteristic of a breed it is apparently an important point, judging by people's reactions, either pro or con, when the subject of an unusual color comes up. In every breed where I have asked the question there have been accusations of crossbreeding and attempting to breed a new color for profit. I have been chastised by some for even mentioning that these colors exist, for fear it will encourage readers to want one or decide to start breeding them. I prefer to allow people to see the controversy and the colors for themselves and make up their own mind what they want to do.

Cirnechi dell'Etna
Cirnechi dell'Etna

How Many Sighthound Breeds Are There?

         Everybody knows there are just a dozen or so Sighthound breeds, right? Watching the Hound Group being judged at a regular American Kennel Club show, you will see the established Sighthound breeds, long-legged and aristocratic, lined up somewhat incongruously next to mostly very different-looking other Hound breeds. First come the Afghan Hound and the Borzoi, then the Greyhound, Ibizan Hound, Pharaoh Hound, Saluki and Scottish Deerhound, with the Whippet at the end.


“The Open Door,” painted by Briton Riviere (1840-1920). The Greyhound is Sir R. Buchanan Jardine’s Long Span, winner of the Waterloo Cup in 1907. The painting was exhibited at the Royal Academy in London in 1915 and was presented to the Kennel Club by F. N. Picket, Esq. This life size painting now hangs in the large dining room of the Kennel Club, London.

Welcome to Sighthound Review!

Perhaps you were like me, not really interested in reading anything except the printed word? I'm pretty old-fashioned in many ways: I still read the daily newspaper at the breakfast table, I enjoy reading the dog newspapers that still arrive in droves by mail, and I usually read myself to sleep with a good book at night — but I have to admit I've changed my habits quite a lot since Sighthound Review went digital. There were several things I liked about the internet already — email! Google!


Carol and Family

Breeders Forum: Carol Harris, Bo-Bett Whippets and Italian Greyhounds

Q: How did you start in dogs? When and how did you fall in love with your breed (or breeds), and how did you go about founding your current breeding program? Briefly outline the most important breeding decisions you made and identify the most successful dogs you have bred. Do you believe in linebreeding or outcrossing?

Pages

Contact Us

Sighthound Review
P.O. Box 10

Ojai, CA 93024, USA

Email:
sighthoundreview@impulse.net

 

Comment Here